Archive for November, 2010

Fake album by Damon Locks for Never Records, New York.

Friday, November 26th, 2010

Phil Jeck with Hildur Gudnadóttir, Never Records Liverpool

Friday, November 26th, 2010

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Phil Jeck performing live at Never Records, Liverpool

Orphan Live Halloween 2010

Sunday, November 21st, 2010

Here are some tracks from Orphan’s live performance from the studio of Nicholas Brooks and Jason Losh. We are planning on cutting a limited edition 10″ cut of the show with original artwork by Nicholas Brooks.

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Photo by Jason Losh

More from Mouraria

Sunday, November 21st, 2010

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Dona America

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

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Lisboa

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

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A letter from the Club Desportivo de Mouraria,

The roasted chestnuts on St. Martin’s day were so hot I had to toss them back and forth in my hands to keep from burning my skin. Risking a burnt tongue for the meaty and complex flavor of the chestnuts, I could always cool my mouth with a plastic cup full of agua-pe. Agua-pe is a light wine made from adding water to the husks of pressed grapes. The drink is illegal in Lisbon, but the big boss of the Club Desportivo de Mouraria toasted me with cup after cup of his home made brew.

They weren’t supposed to sing Fado for us that day. My gracious guides, Jose and Teresa, had brought me to this collective with the slight hope that I could record some a capella songs and stories. Ethan, Carlos, and Jose had come as emissaries the week before, and Ethan, who is a large and imposing guy himself, was intimidated by all of the rough “gangsters” who seemed intensely suspicious of outsiders.

As we talked to the seventy-year-old godmother of the collective, the risible Dona America, we were being watched. I don’t blame them for being suspicious, I must have seemed so odd to them with my Antagonist clothes, American sneakers, and my recording equipment. Jose noticed through a door, opened ajar, a council of men in track suits debating whether or not they could trust us. I was oblivious.

They must have sensed my earnestness because, after forty-five minutes, they sent for musicians. The room was rearranged, the lights dimmed, and Jose came running over to me, saying, “They are going to do the Fado for us!” And so, the Fado began. That hour was one of those crystalline times when one feels the power of life to strip us of our immurement in safe and deadening routine. And for one pure moment we sit in naked, sensate vulnerability brought back to life once more by music and laughter and fellowship.

As we were leaving the club, Jose remarked that they had paid the musicians to play for us. This made me uncomfortable. It was clear to me that the building that housed the club needed repairs, and that the club’s scarce resources could have been put to better use. Sensing my concern, Jose reassured me, “All of these traditional collectives are dying in Lisbon. They are being ignored. For you to come and show genuine interest in the Fado makes them feel pride, and this pride is what keeps them alive.”

The Specific Ocean

Monday, November 15th, 2010

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Moses Asch

Friday, November 5th, 2010

Photo by David Gahr

Smithsonian Folkways Mission
Smithsonian Folkways Recordings is the nonprofit record label of the Smithsonian Institution, the national museum of the United States. We are dedicated to supporting cultural diversity and increased understanding among peoples through the documentation, preservation, and dissemination of sound. We believe that musical and cultural diversity contributes to the vitality and quality of life throughout the world. Through the dissemination of audio recordings and educational materials we seek to strengthen people’s engagement with their own cultural heritage and to enhance their awareness and appreciation of the cultural heritage of others. Our mission is the legacy of Moses Asch, who founded Folkways Records in 1948 to document “people’s music,” spoken word, instruction, and sounds from around the world. The Smithsonian acquired Folkways from the Asch estate in 1987, and Smithsonian Folkways Recordings has continued the Folkways commitment to cultural diversity, education, increased understanding, and lively engagement with the world of sound.

Our History
Folkways Records & Service Co. was incorporated in 1948 in New York City by Moses Asch (1905-1986) and Marian Distler (1919-1964). Under Asch’s enthusiastic and dedicated direction, Folkways sought to record and document the entire world of sound. Between 1948 and Asch’s death, Folkways’ tiny staff released 2,168 albums. Topics included traditional, ethnic, and contemporary music from around the world; poetry, spoken word, and instructional recordings in numerous languages; and documentary recordings of individuals, communities, current events, and natural sounds.

As one of the first record companies to offer albums of “world music,” and as an early exponent of the singers and songwriters who formed the core of the American folk music revival (including such giants as Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Lead Belly), Asch’s Folkways grew to become one of the most influential record companies in the world.

Following Asch’s death, in 1987 the Smithsonian Institution Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage in Washington D.C. acquired Folkways Recordings and the label’s business papers and files to ensure that the sounds and genius of its artists would continue to be available to future generations.

As a condition of the acquisition, the Smithsonian agreed that virtually all of the firm’s 2,168 titles would remain “in print” forever—a condition that Smithsonian Folkways continues to honor through its custom order service. Whether it sells 8,000 copies each year or only one copy every five years, every Folkways title remains available for purchase.
http://www.folkways.si.edu/

Nicholas Brooks

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

Where does Phil's mom live again?

Kogumaza

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

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Shoe gazing stonerness. mmmmmm mmmm goood.